Friday, December 25, 2009

Budweiser Clydesdale Ready for Opening Day at Santa Anita



A team of the world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales are stabled at Santa Anita Racetrack awaiting their scheduled on-track performance on Opening Day of the 75th Anniversary Santa Anita Winter-Spring Meet on Saturday, Dec. 26.

This particular team is from Booneville, Missouri and travels strictly in the western United States. It is one of six traveling hitches of the majestic horses, which are on the road approximately 11 months a year. Clydesdales were once used as workhorses to pull heavy loads, but the Budweiser horses are now just used for appearances at fairs, parades, and other festivities.

Each of the traveling hitches consists of 10 horses. The horses stand about 6 feet at the shoulder and weight about 2,000 pounds. According to Anheuser-Busch regulations, the horses must be bay in color, have four white stocking feet and a white blaze on the face, and a black mane and tail.

They have been a popular opening day tradition at Santa Anita, and it is always a delight to watch these gentle giants perform!

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Apart from one, they didn't look very happy. ears back, stiff attitude. I hope their handlers are nice to them.

Anonymous said...

They are watched them all week.

UpInClass Racing Forum (USA) said...

Wonderful Mary...
love everything about your site!

Pat said...

I just love to see the Clyesdales perform. If you like the Clyesdadales to check out this site it has tin signs with clyesdales on them. www.tinsignguru.com

Stephanie Lambert said...

I can assure u that these horses are treated well, they are not only fit, well groomed & trained but they are a very large part of Anheiser Bush's (sp?) charities and public relations, they would not do a thing to tarnish that what-so-ever. Can you imagine the public relations nightmare that would be? They are also handled by the same handlers on a constant basis and are well loved, they were probably bored and tired of all the days crap that was happening. Most draft horses just want to be left to their Hay and Chores. VBG

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